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Lamella roof

, Vaultedroofconsisting of a crisscrossing pattern of parallel arches skewed with respect to the sides of the covered space, composed of relatively short members (lamellae) hinged together to form an interlocking network in a diamond pattern. It was used for the first two great covered sports stadiums built in the U.S. since the 1960s: the HoustonAstrodome(196264), with a span of 642 ft (196 m), and theNew OrleansSuperdome(1973), 678 ft (207 m) in diameter.

in these related Britannica articles:

building construction: Postwar developments in long-span construction

steel trussed dome is the lamella dome, which is made of intersecting arches hinged together at their midpoints to form an interlocking network in a diamond pattern. It was used for the first two examples of the great covered sports stadiums built in the United States since the 1960s: the

, the worlds first domed air-conditioned indoor stadium, built in Houston, Texas, in 1965 and arguably the citys most important architectural structure. Conceived by Roy Mark Hofheinz (a former county judge and mayor of Houston, 195355) and designed by architects Hermon Lloyd and W.B. Morgan,

Dome, in architecture, hemispherical structure evolved from the arch, usually forming a ceiling or roof. Domes first appeared as solid mounds and in techniques adaptable only to the smallest buildings, such as round huts and tombs in the ancient Middle East, India, and the Mediterranean. The Romans

Roof, covering of the top of a building, serving to protect against rain, snow, sunlight, wind, and extremes of temperature. Roofs have been constructed in a wide variety of formsflat, pitched, vaulted, domed, or in combinationsas dictated by technical, economic, or aesthetic considerations. The

Cupola, in architecture, small dome, often resembling an overturned cup, placed on a circular, polygonal, or square base or on small pillars or a glassed-in lantern. It is used to crown a turret, roof, or larger dome. The inner vault of a dome is also a cupola. Cupolas, usually bulbous or pointed,

1 reference found in Britannica articles

Inbuilding construction: Postwar developments in long-span construction

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